Resources

Toolkit

Find downloadable materials, fact-sheets, information, videos, links to information repositories and links to services in the categories below. Please contact us if you’d like to add your resources to this site.

services and referrals


If you or someone you know is experiencing domestic and family violence, please call one of the numbers below

1800 Respect

24-hour national sexual assault, family and domestic violence counselling line for any Australian who has experienced, or is at risk of, family and domestic violence and/or sexual assault.

Call toll-free 1800 737 732.

Lifeline

Lifeline has a national number who can help put you in contact with a crisis service in your State.

Anyone across Australia experiencing a personal crisis or thinking about suicide can call 13 11 14.

Men’s Referral Service

This service from No to Violence offers assistance, information and counselling to help men who use family violence.

Call 1300 766 491 if you would like help with male behavioural and relationship concerns.

Lucy’s Project believes that a properly funded referral network to link domestic violence services with animal welfare, rights and protection services is a fundamental need in tackling the domestic and family violence crisis in this country. We continue to advocate for this service and in the interim, do the best we can to help wherever possible.

We hope the links in this website are useful. If there is a particular kind of service you are trying to access that is not listed on this page, email us at info@lucysproject.com and we will see if we can help further. We receive no funding to do this work and are a volunteer run organisation.

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Identify Domestic Abuse

Poster by Kyogle Family & Domestic Violence Working Group

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support services for animals, by state


NSW

RSPCA Community Domestic Violence Program
This community program was previously known as Safe Beds for Pets. For more information please contact the RSPCA Community Programs helpline (02) 9782 4408. The helpline operates Monday to Friday, 9am- 5pm. During weekends and public holidays contact the RSPCA Contact Centre on (02) 9770 7555.

Animal Welfare League
Report cruelty, surrender an animal, advocacy

Northern Rivers region

Animal Rights and Rescue Group
For surrender of animals and assistance in a domestic violence crisis, supported by Lucy’s Project.

Northern Rivers Animal Services
Northern Rivers Animal Services (NRAS) is a self-funded, not-for-profit, registered Charity that commenced in October 2001 to provide foster care and the opportunity to re-home the abandoned, abused, lost and unwanted dogs and cats in the Northern Rivers region of NSW.

K.I.T.T.E.N at Pets and Saddles Lismore
Rescue for cats in troubled times.

Byron Dog Rescue

Animal Welfare League, NSW, Mullumbimby branch

South Australia

Safe Pets, Safe Families
SPSF a registered charity providing programs and services to people and their pets in the Australian community who are facing disadvantage and crisis situations, predominately domestic violence. We are currently only in SA but aspire to be nation-wide.

RSPCA SA Safe Kennels
RSPCA South Australia is committed to working with the community and all organisations responding to domestic and family violence to help families and their pets find safety.

Victoria

Eastern Domestic Violence Outreach Service
Domestic Violence support for humans with (and without) animals

 

 Epping Animal Welfare Facility operated by RSPCA Victoria.

The Epping Animal Welfare Facility (EAWF), operated by RSPCA Victoria (RSPCA), will accommodate and care for domestic animals of residents impacted by family violence in the cities of Whittlesea, Darebin and Moreland.This does not apply to restricted breed or declared dangerous dogs. Access- for  specialist family violence services and other agencies. Individuals encouraged to make contact through a support worker.  Factsheet here-Info for Services

Lort Smith

Veterinary practice in Melbourne offering community programs and assistance for people with animals.

Cherished Pets

Cherished Pets is a unique veterinary social enterprise established in 2015 in the Geelong region of Victoria, Australia by veterinarian Dr Alicia Kennedy.

Our Mission: to support companion pet ownership of vulnerable people and to support pets and their people through all life stages, including vulnerable times.

Cherished Pets Community Veterinary Care (CPCVC) – a social benefit company that offers a unique bond-centred veterinary service.

Cherished Pets Foundation (CPF) – the charitable partner of Cherished Pets, that exists to support companion pet ownership of elderly and disabled people living in the Bellarine region.

QLD

RSPCA QLD Pets in Crisis

TLG Family, Children and Animal Law
TLG are fervent supporters of animal rights and welfare that are protected by law and groups such as the RSPCA.

ACT

RSPCA ACT, Project Safe
Project SAFE stands for Support for Animals and Families in Emergencies and is designed to be a safe haven and emergency short-term care for the pets of victims fleeing domestic violence. Animals that enter the Shelter under this program also receive a full vet check, vaccinations; as well as have other immediate medical needs met. While dogs and cats are the most common pet in this program, we have also helped other small animals.

Animal Defenders Office
The ADO provides free advice on how the law affects animals and animal advocates, and how it can be used to protect them.  We also take an active role in law reform and policy formulation regarding animals and provide information materials designed both to increase awareness of animal protection issues and to empower the community to engage in public decision-making affecting animals.

WA

RSPCA WA Pets in Crisis
The Pets in Crisis program offers a temporary home for pets from households experiencing family and domestic violence while their owner seeks refuge or temporary accommodation of their own. This helps to alleviate some of the logistical stress of removing themselves and their loved ones from a dangerous home environment.

Patricia Giles Centre

Tasmania

Shelter TAS
Emergency boarding for pets

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information for veterinarians


A resource for veterinarians on recognizing and reporting animal abuse
The link between family violence and animal abuse: a guide for Vets and their staff, Deborah Thiel,

Intimate Partner Violence and companion animal welfare- CM Tiplady, DM Walsh and CJC Phillips, in The Journal of the Australian Veterinary Association Ltd, Volume 90 No1-2, January/February 2012 Intimate partner violence and companion animal welfare

Identifying non-accidental injury cases in veterinary practice, Dr. Lydia Tong, In Practice, February 2016, Volume 38, 59-68Identifying non-accidental injury cases in veterinary practice

Help uncover veterinary experiences of abuse in animals and people, Catherine Tiplady BVSc, BAppSci (Hons), September 2011, Veterinary Medicine, dvm360.com Help uncover veterinary experiences of abuse in animals and people

Family violence and animal cruelty – SECASA

This resource is for animal care professionals with information about family violence, the abuse of animals, legal considerations and how to respond.

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Identifying Non-Accidental Injury in animals – Dr. Lydia Tong

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books


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Dr. Catherine Tiplady, Cabi, 2013

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Nik Taylor, Heather Fraser. Palgrave 2019, Dr. Catherine Tiplady, Cabi, 2013

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children as victims


Animal Abuse and The Children- European Link Coalition and the UN Convention on the Rights of the child

“Protect the animal to save the child, protect the child to save the animal”. The European Link Coalition have been actively lobbying and working with the UN on the UN Convention for the Rights of the Child, who recognise the traumatic impact on children who witness abuse to animals.

https://www.europeanlinkcoalition.com/animal-abuse-the-children

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Animal Cruelty as an indicator of family trauma- using adverse childhood experiences to look beyond child abuse and domestic violence

 Abstract- Animal cruelty as an indicator of family traumaYouth who engage in animal cruelty are known to be at increased risk of perpetrating violence on other people in their lives including peers, loved ones, and elder family members. These youths have often been exposed to family violence, including animal cruelty perpetrated on their beloved pets by violent adults. The current study utilizes a data set of 81,000 juvenile offenders whose adverse childhood experiences are known and includes 466 youth who self-report engaging in animal cruelty. Compared to the larger group of juvenile offenders, the children admitting to engaging in animal cruelty are younger at time of first arrest, more likely to be male, and more likely to be White. When looking at their reports of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), they are more likely than other juvenile offenders to have an array of adverse experiences beyond family violence and to have four or more ACEs. Although the youth who are cruel to animals are already troubled, the fact that they present to law enforcement at early ages provides early opportunities for intervention. Service providers outside the law enforcement field, such as teachers, physicians, veterinarians and animal control officers may be able to identify these vulnerable youth, and refer them to needed services before violence is visited on other humans.

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Building Animal Relationships with Kids

Patricia Giles Centre – Building Animal Relationships with Kids (BARK) information flyer

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JCAT Shelby 2016 patterns of adjustment

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The Children’s Treatment of Animals Questionnaire: A Rasch Analysis

The current study extends what is known about the psychometric properties of the CTAQ by using traditional and item response theory analyses.

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co-housing shelters


SAF-T Program – Allie Phillips. Many resources for “Sheltering Animals and Families- Together”. “ A global initiative helping domestic and family violence shelters to create on-site pet housing for families fleeing domestic violence”.

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Safe Havens for Pets

Safe Havens for Pets – Guidelines for Programs Sheltering Pets for women who are battered – Frank Ascione

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crisis / COVID support


How does a public health pandemic affect the occurrence of family violence?

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For many people, public health measures introduced to reduce the spread of COVID-19 such as ‘social distancing’ and isolation; as well as increased financial insecurity and reduced ability to leave relationships may increase their risk of family violence.

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DV VIC on info for victim survivors

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housing / rental / strata


Keeping Pets in Strata Schemes

Keeping Pets in Strata Schemes, NSW Young Lawyers Animal Law Committee

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Contact People and Pets for help with accommodation with animals.

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academic / research / statistics


Arluke, A., Levin, J., Luke, C., & Ascione, F. (1999)

The relationship of animal abuse to violence and other forms of antisocial behavior. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 14, 963-975.

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Ascione, F.R. (1998)

Battered women’s reports of their partners’ and their children’s cruelty to animals. Journal of Emotional Abuse, 1, 119-133.

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Ascione, F.R., Friedrich, W.N., Heath, J., & Hayashi, K. (2003)

Cruelty to animals in normative, sexually abused, and outpatient psychiatric samples of 6- to 12-year-old children: Relations to maltreatment and exposure to domestic violence. Anthrozoos , 16, 195-211.

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Ascione, F.R., Weber, C.V., Thompson, T.M., Heath, J., Maruyama, M., & Hayashi, K. (2007)

Battered pets and domestic violence: Animal abuse reported by women experiencing intimate violence and by non-abused women. Violence Against Women, 13, 354-373.

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Baldry, A. (2003)

Animal abuse and exposure to interparental violence in Italian youth. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 18, 258-281.

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Becker F & French L (2004)

Making the link: Child abuse, animal cruelty and domestic violence. Child Abuse Review 13: 399-414.

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Boat, B.W. (1995)

Commentary: The relationship between violence to children and violence to animals. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 10, 229-235.

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Carlisle-Frank, P., Frank, J.M., & Nielsen, L. (2004)

Selective battering of the family pet. Anthrozoos, 17, 26-41.

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Currie, C.L. (2005)

Animal cruelty by children exposed to domestic violence. Child Abuse & Neglect, 30, 425-435.

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Cutt D, Signal T & Taylor N (2015)

Mandated reporting of suspected animal harm by Australian veterinarians: community attitudes. Anthrozoos 28:3 437-447.

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Dadds, M.R., Whiting, C., & Hawes, D. (2006)

Associations among cruelty to animals, family conflict, and psychopathic traits in childhood. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 21, 411-429.

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DeGue S & DiLillo D (2008)

Is animal cruelty a ‘red flag’ for family violence? Investigating co-occurring violence toward children, partners and pets. Journal of Interpersonal Violence 24(6): 1036-1056.

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DeViney, E., Dickert, J., & Lockwood, R. (1983)

The care of pets within child abusing families. International Journal for the Study of Animal Problems, 4, 321-329.

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Duncan, A., Thomas, J.C., & Miller, C. (2005)

Significance of family risk factors in development of childhood animal cruelty in adolescent boys with conduct problems. Journal of Family Violence, 20, 235-239.

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ECAV is a NSW Health focus group that offers training regarding the link between DFV and animal abuse. They are trauma informed and work collaboratively with animal welfare and human services.

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Faver, C.A., & Strand, E.B. (2003)

To leave or to stay? Battered women’s concern for vulnerable pets. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 18, 1367-1377.

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Fawcett NR, Gullone E and Johnson J. (2002)

The relationship between animal abuse and domestic violence: implications for animal welfare agencies and domestic violence organisations. Domestic Violence Clearinghouse Newsletter, Issue 10 (March), 4-7.

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Fitzgerald AJ (2007)

“They gave me a reason to live”: The protective effects of companion animals on the suicidality of abused women. Humanity and Society 31: 355-378.

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Flynn, C.P. (2000)

Why family professionals can no longer ignore violence toward animals. Family Relations, 49, 87-95.

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law / enforcement / policing


Humane Society United States – Violence Prevention and Intervention

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news / media


Attorney-General Mark Speakman ordered his department to review the connection between animal abuse and domestic violence.

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Amsterdam has become the first major European city to publicly fund an animal shelter for pets belonging to victims of domestic violence.

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The Relationship between Animal and Interpersonal Abuse

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A day in the office for Barbara Steffensen, the founder and CEO of the Animal Rights and Rescue Group.

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Lucy’s project aims to raise awareness and funds for further research into the use of animals in domestic violence and develop early intervention programs.

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Sometimes referred to as “intimate terrorism”, coercive control chips away at victims’ sense of safety and independence.

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Abusers often use pets to manipulate and control, and there’s the additional problem that few refuges allow pets. One charity in Adelaide is trying to address the issue.

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There are tell-tale signs that vets notice when pets are brought in with injuries.

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There are lots of reasons why women in abusive relationships don’t always leave — a lack of finances, accommodation and concerns about children.

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Dr Tong, from the University of Sydney, is now embarking on a study to examine the link between pets being harmed by their owners and domestic violence.

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Sometimes it’s the vet who is the first medical professional to see the signs of family violence.

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CRISIS accommodation is now available for women, children and their pets fleeing family violence.

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The Law Must Protect Animals and Punish Animal Abusers

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New research shows that concern for suffering isn’t zero-sum

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How veterinary staff can respond to abused clients and patients

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international


LINK Europe

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The aim of Hidden Hurt was to facilitate finding out about domestic abuse in a less formal tone and having the opportunity of discussing our situations and progress with other victims and survivors, hence offering mutual support.

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Guidelines for Programs Sheltering Pets for Women who are Battered

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The National Coalition on Violence Against Animals was established as an independent collective of local, state and national organizations that focus on animal cruelty and its relationship to other forms of violence.

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The Link is the National (USA) Resource Centre on The Link between Animal Abuse and Human Violence.

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Our mission is to provide a safe, temporary place for all pets when their guardians are faced with trying to leave a bad situation.

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reports


Studies suggest that animal abuse may be an indication of more serious forms of interpersonal abuse

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Building Animal Relationships with Kids

Patricia Giles Centre – Building Animal Relationships with Kids (BARK) information flyer

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Research Shows the Link Between Cruelty to Animals and Toward Humans

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Lucy’s Project believes that a properly funded referral network to link domestic violence services with animal welfare, rights and protection services is a fundamental need in tackling the domestic and family violence crisis in this country.

We continue to advocate for this service and in the interim, do the best we can to help wherever possible.

We hope the links in this website are useful. If there is a particular kind of service you are trying to access that is not listed on this page, email us at info@lucysproject.com and we will see if we can help further.

We receive no funding to do this work and are a volunteer run organisation.

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